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We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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  • Overview

    In order to obtain a grant of probate, the deceased’s original will must be lodged at the Probate Registry alongside the probate application.  There are occasions when the original will is not available which adds an additional layer of complexity.

    As part of the probate application process the executors of an estate must lodge the original will at the Probate Registry before a grant of probate will be issued. 

    Occasionally, the executors of an estate may not be able to locate the original will.  The will could perhaps have been misplaced by the testator/testatrix in their lifetime, have been lost in storage or even lost by the executor.
    A copy of the will can be used to obtain a grant of probate to an estate provided appropriate and detailed evidence can be submitted to the Probate Registry to satisfy the Registrar why a copy should be proved in place of the original.  This is usually in the form of affidavit evidence. 

    We have recently acted for an estate where the original will was lost by the executor.  There were no signed copies available to be used and the grant application was submitted on the basis of a final unsigned draft. 
    We assisted the executor in collating all of the evidence and dealing with the additional formalities required to obtain the grant of probate.  This included liaising with numerous parties in relation to the attestation of the will and anyone prejudiced by the application.     

    A grant was successfully issued allowing the executor to administer the estate in accordance with the testators last will.  

  • Related Services

    Probate

    A probate lawyer will give you clear guidance about the different levels of service on offer, the steps involved, the costs and probable timings.

    Grant of Representation

    Using a lawyer to apply for a Grant of Representation can unlock your assets more quickly and save you time.  

    Executor support service

    Using our Executor Support Service in the probate process means you can hand over the tasks you lack the time or knowledge to carry out.  

    Full estate administration

    Getting a lawyer to take on responsibility of the entire process of estate administration is less stressful and less time-consuming.  

    Probate Questionnaire

    Inheritance, will & trust disputes

    Contentious trusts and probate is a legal term used to describe disputes over inheritance, wills or trusts. It is a specialist and very technical area of law. That is why it is important to have an expert on hand.

Newsletter Sign Up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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