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  • Overview

    Our client had been appointed as the sole executor and a major beneficiary under her mother’s last Will. However, the client’s half siblings, by claiming that there was no Will, had obtained a grant from the Probate Registry to administer the estate.

    Following a trial on written evidence, an order was made for the Will to be admitted to probate without much opposition from the defendants. The Court found it ‘troubling’ that the defendants had sworn the oath and obtained the grant when they were aware of the Will. It was thought to be ‘extremely troubling’ that the defendants had not distributed any of the deceased’s estate to our client, nor contacted her as a beneficiary, which she would have been under the default rules that apply in the absence of a Will.  An order was made for the defendants to account for any monies distributed from the estate and our client was awarded their full litigation costs.

  • Related Services

    Probate disputes

    When someone dies, bitter disputes can arise between family members or between family and non-family beneficiaries such as charities.

    Will disputes

    Our expert lawyers include members of The Association of Contentious Trust and Probate Specialists and are experts in dealing with these types of disputes. They will adopt a sensitive but commercial approach, looking for innovative solutions, and will strive to get the best outcome for you.

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

Newsletter Sign Up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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Jargon Buster