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I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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  • Overview

    Our client was one of 12 beneficiaries of their late father’s £600,000 estate, the administration of which (including the sale of a property) was prevented by a surprise caveat lodged by another beneficiary. Upon sight of a letter originally sent by the caveator to the Executors in July 2020, we were able to contact the caveator in February 2021 to comprehensively address each of the concerns noted in their letter and highlight that none of these was a valid reason to register a caveat against the estate. Our letter also set out that a caveat registered improperly risks leaving the caveator liable for costs incurred in its removal and that any delay to the administration of the estate risked a deterioration in the property and, therefore, in the value each beneficiary can expect to receive.

    Although no further correspondence was received form the caveator, the caveat was subsequently and promptly withdrawn the month following our letter and the administration of the estate allowed to commence.

  • Related Services

    Will disputes

    A will is no ordinary document.  It is the expression of the last, yet most important decision anyone can ever make.  It disposes of everything a person has had.  The extraordinary nature of what a will is, means that when it comes to doubts or disagreement over a will’s validity or effect, you want to be sure that the adviser you have on your side is a true specialist.

    Inheritance, will & trust disputes

    Contentious trusts and probate is a legal term used to describe disputes over inheritance, wills or trusts. It is a specialist and very technical area of law. That is why it is important to have an expert on hand.

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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Jargon Buster