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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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  • Overview

    After the death of Lord Snowdon earlier this year, it was revealed he had left his first-born illegitimate daughter out of his £3.2m estate. Amy Wilford speaks to yourmoney.com about the legal implications. Instead Princess Margaret’s former husband split his estate between his three children from his two marriages, and a son, who was born out of wedlock.

    Instead Princess Margaret’s former husband split his estate between his three children from his two marriages, and a son, who was born out of wedlock.

    The general rule in England and Wales is that, a testator, i.e. a person making a will, can leave what they chose to whomever they chose, which includes disinheriting a child. There are often valid reasons for doing so. However, a child of the deceased can bring a claim under the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975 (the ‘1975 Act’) if the will is not thought to provide reasonable financial provision for

    The full article can be found here: Can you disinherit a child?

    Do you have questions about writing your will? Visit our Wills, Trusts & Tax Planning page for more information.

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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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Jargon Buster