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  • Overview

    Last year, in Barbulescu v Romania, the European Court of Human Rights decided that employers were able to monitor their workers’ emails where there was a good reason for doing so. Now, in a surprising turn of events, that decision has been reversed on appeal.

    While employers have a legitimate interest in protecting their businesses and ensuring that their workers are using company time and equipment properly, the Court also recognised that worker’s private lives extend into the workplace. The Court did not rule out the possibility of employers monitoring their workers, but pointed out a few key factors that employers need to consider before they can do so:

    • Workers need to be given clear notice in advance of the monitoring of their emails and other communications
    • While employers may be able to monitor who a worker is contacting and when (i.e. the 'traffic'), they will need much stronger justification if they look at the actual content of the communication itself
    • The employers needs to consider the consequences on the worker of monitoring their communications - will it intrude into their personal lives? Is the monitoring overbearing?
    • Employers should have safeguards in place when monitoring communications, and workers should be made aware of these safeguards. This is particularly important where the actual content of communications is being monitored.
       

    In the UK, much of this ground is already covered by the Data Protection Act and existing good practice, but it does underline the importance to employers of making sure that their monitoring of workers is proportionate and justified, and that workers are aware that their communications may be monitored. It is not enough for employers to simply tell their workers that their emails may be monitored - they need to clearly set out:

    • When communications may be monitored
    • Why communications are being monitored
    • How any information taken will be used
    • Who the information will be disclosed to
       

    For most companies, this means making sure that this information is included in their IT & Digital Communications Policy, and, in a perfect world, ensuring that their workers have actually read the policy and agreed to it.

    This is an actively changing area, particularly with the deadline for compliance with the EU General Data Protection Regulation on 25 May 2018 fast approaching. If you would like to know more, please contact our corporate & commercial team on 01892 510000.

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    Employment policies

    We have a wealth of experience in drafting employment policies and procedures.

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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