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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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  • Overview

    The motion to approve the Non-Contentious Probate (Fees) Order had been due to be voted on in the House of Commons for some time.

    If approved, this would have seen probate fees rise from the existing fixed fee of £215 (£155 with a solicitor) to up to £6,000, depending on the size of the estate.

    Earlier in September the proposal formally lapsed – much to the relief of practitioners and bereaved families – due to the prorogation of Parliament. 

    However, now that the prorogation has been ruled as null and void, it begs the question as to what next for probate fees. We will be monitoring the situation closely and issuing updates as things become clearer.

  • Related Services

    Probate

    A probate lawyer will give you clear guidance about the different levels of service on offer, the steps involved, the costs and probable timings.

    Probate disputes

    When someone dies, bitter disputes can arise between family members or between family and non-family beneficiaries such as charities.

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

Newsletter Sign Up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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