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Newsletter Sign Up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

  • Overview

    I have been told I might be made redundant, what should I do?

    Your employer must follow specific processes when making redundancies. If they do not, you may be able to claim you have been dismissed unfairly.

    By law, your employer must consult with you if you are affected by proposed redundancies and they should take your comments and feedback into account.

    It is also very important that your employer does not discriminate when selecting employees for redundancy. For example, you should not be made redundant due to e.g. your age, sex, race, religion or part-time or fixed term employment.

    If you feel your employer is not following the right process then we would be happy to advise you.

    How much notice of redundancy should I get?

    You can only be given notice once the consultation process and a minimum time period has passed (the length of this depends on how many people from your place of work are being made redundant).

    Your notice period will depend on how long you have worked for the company, as well as what is specified in your employment contract.

    How much redundancy pay will I be entitled to?

    This again depends on how long you have worked for your employer, your age and the terms of your employment contract. 

    We regularly help individuals get a fair redundancy settlement as quickly as possible and would be happy to advise.

    We have a dedicated page to redundancy which you may find of interest by clicking the link here. There is also a handy redundancy calculator which you can download from the website. Alternatively get in touch with any of the employment team.

Newsletter Sign Up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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