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I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

  • Overview

    Many people have a social media presence, Instagram has grown in popularity during the pandemic and many still use Facebook. Regular updates to family and friends can provide a wealth of information. Whilst you are in a happy relationship social media may not be too much of a concern, but if that relationship comes to an end, consideration needs to be given to how social media could impact the separation and divorce process.

    Even if you and your spouse/partner defriend the other on social media there will still be many ‘friends’ who remain and can report what has been posted. If you are going through a divorce, financial matters arising from divorce or disputes regarding children it is sensible to be mindful of the implications. It may even be that you don’t post yourself but you are tagged in posts that are automatically uploaded and viewed by others. Those posts may come back and be used against you.

    In disputes about arrangements for children, comments on social media, photos with certain other people etc could all be saved and printed and used in arguments. It goes without saying that derogatory comments about the other party are ill advised and generally frowned upon by judges if court proceedings are started, but a snapshot of your lifestyle might also be used against you.

    There can also be disputes about what one parent posts on social media involving their children that the other parent doesn’t like.

    Even in financial proceedings the posts on social media might be raised by the other side, they may show you enjoyed a certain lifestyle that you have denied, trips away that show you have an income you say you don’t. Social media may also announce a new relationship that hasn’t been disclosed and new living arrangements. All of this could have a bearing on the financial outcome.

    Even if you think you no longer have any mutual friends, it is sensible to remember with a large number of followers or friends online you can never be sure who will be able to access those photos and personal updates. Even with security settings as strong as possible, it is not difficult to obtain personal information about another person, whether they want you to or not.

  • Related Services

    Family

    Dealing with the legal aspects of a relationship or family breakdown requires a thorough knowledge of the law and a tactful, understanding approach.

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I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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Jargon Buster