Skip to Main content

Search results for ''...


Sorry, there were no results

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

  • Overview

    Amid reports of UK companies including ‘no jab no job’ contract clauses for new employees, Ben Stepney from our employment team, recently shared his thoughts on the legalities of this approach with Your Money.

    Ben says: “The legal risks associated with imposing a requirement on new recruits to have received their Covid-19 vaccination, as opposed to existing employees, may be less, but still needs serious consideration. The primary concern is of indirect discrimination claims on the basis that the requirement to have received the vaccine could put those of a certain race, religion or with certain disabilities to an unfair disadvantage.

    “Employers can justify indirect discrimination where they can show it is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim, such as protecting the health and safety of the working environment and colleagues they work with. It would be key therefore for employers to have thought through exactly why they wish to require new recruits to have received the vaccination and whether there are proportionately less intrusive means of achieving the same aim.”

    “Employers are likely to be on stronger ground in justifying vaccination where the workplace does not make social distancing easy, for example care homes, and with reference to the primacy of health and safety of staff, customers, visitors and service users (as applicable).”

    Ben’s comments first appeared in this article in Your Money

  • Related Services

    Employment advice for employees

    Our employment solicitors give straightforward legal advice, find proactive solutions and achieve quick results

    Employment

    We act for businesses of all shapes and sizes and in many different sectors. Our advice covers all aspects of the employment relationship, helping to settle disputes, defending employment tribunal claims and providing immigration compliance audits.

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

^
Jargon Buster