Skip to Main content

Search results for ''...


Sorry, there were no results

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

  • Overview

    Our client’s father made a Will splitting his estate equally between his children. Our client’s sibling disputed the Will on the belief that one should be entitled to a larger share of the estate to compensate for financial assistance that the others had received from their parents during their lifetime.

    The disputing sibling relied upon a letter the father wrote many years before, acknowledging the gifts made to others.  However, the letter was written before the Will was made. If the father therefore wanted to reduce one child’s legacy to take account of the gifts that child received, he could have done that when making his Will.  For whatever reason he did not do so.  The letter could not be used as a tool for making changes to the Will following the father’s death.

    Following review of the sibling’s allegations, we were able to demonstrate that one’s demands for an increase to their inheritance were likely to fail.  In addition, the associated delays caused by the dispute were increasing the costs of administration, which was an ongoing detriment to the estate and fellow beneficiaries.

    We successfully convinced the disputing sibling to withdraw their claim against the estate, so that the administration could progress and the estate be divided in equal shares.

  • Related Services

    Dispute Resolution

    Our objective is to achieve swift, realistic results in the most cost efficient and risk free manner possible. Our Dispute Resolution team specialise in resolving a wide range of disputes for individuals.  

Newsletter sign up

I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

Get In Touch

By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

^
Jargon Buster