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  • Overview

    We represented a child (acting through their Litigation Friend) following the death of their father.  The Deceased passed away leaving a Will, in which he made a gift of a property to his sibling and the remainder of the estate to our client, the Deceased’s only child that following his death was left an orphan. 

    The Deceased’s fiancée, due to receive nothing under the terms of the Will was insisting that the Deceased intended to change his Will before his death so that she would continue to be supported by him, just as she was during his lifetime. She issued a claim under the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975, which we were defending.

    Shortly after the claim was issued, we managed to negotiate a settlement, which allowed for our client’s legacy to remain intact.  The provision for the disappointed fiancée was made wholly out of the specific legacy due to the Deceased’s sibling.

    If you are a beneficiary (or a Litigation Friend of a beneficiary) in a Will that is being challenged please do not hesitate to contact our friendly will, trusts and estate dispute lawyers on 01892 510 000.

  • Related Services

    Inheritance Act Claims

    Claims can have a high financial cost and be damaging to family relationships, so whether you are making or defending a claim, consulting a specialist like us, early on in the process, is highly recommended.

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I would like to receive newsletters, event invitations and publications from Thomson Snell & Passmore by email on the following topics (tick all those that apply) and consent for my data to be processed for this purpose.

We respect your privacy and want news to be relevant. To either, click here or update your preferences by emailing us at info@ts-p.co.uk. Your personal data shall be treated in accordance with our & .

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By submitting an enquiry through 'get in touch' your data will only be used to contact you regarding your enquiry. If you would like to receive newsletters from Thomson Snell & Passmore please use the separate form below.

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Jargon Buster